The recently released images — from the second time NASA's Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) satellite has watched the moon pass in … The Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) satellite, which had been out of commission for about nine months due to a technical problem, is fully operational again, according to NOAA. NASA's online science magazine, Earth Observatory, has released over 16,000 stunning space images since its inception in 1999. Scroll down to see a selection of the photos that Nasa put up for a public reckoning.

A Nasa camera aboard the Deep Space Climate Observatory captured this unique view of the moon …

Last month, the Deep Space Climate Observatory captured a series of test photos with its Earth Polychromatic Imaging Camera. For the second time in a year, the Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) satellite has captured a stunning time-lapse video of the moon crossing the sunlit face of Earth.. There's a camera on NASA's Deep Space Climate Observatory satellite that sits a million miles away from Earth. It will be able to capture deep-space images with the same resolution as Hubble, but its field of view is 100 times wider, allowing it to image more of the sky in a shorter amount of time. The camera aboard the Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) satellite caught the dark side of the moon… This 2015 animation still shows the moon crossing the Earth. A NASA camera aboard the Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) satellite captured a picture of the moon as it passed between the satellite and Earth, according to NASA. From its lofty perch 1 million miles from Earth, EPIC looked on as the moon transited our planet: A Nasa camera aboard the Deep Space Climate Observatory captured this unique view of the moon as it passed between the spacecraft and Earth in August 2015 This awe-inspiring image was captured by an astronaut onboard the International Space Station in December 2013. The EPIC camera on-board NASA's Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) has captured images of the Moon passing in front of the Earth as the Earth rotates behind it.