13.8 billion years ago, the Universe as we know it began with the hot Big Bang. Advertisement Subscribe to BBC Focus magazine for fascinating new Q&As every month and follow @sciencefocusQA on …
Well, our universe does have an edge — that is, if by "our universe," you mean the observable universe. So we have the big bang(s) and the boundary begins to move outward, at least at the speed of light (knowing there is debate about variable speeds of light, I am keeping this open). It's a reality so basic, grade school kids learn it. Which seems an impossibility, because something happened.

Since the events before the big bang have no relevance or influence over the physics of today, in all practicality time does not exist before that singularity. =====. The Milky Way is the galaxy we live in, one of the countless collections of stars and dust throughout the universe. How close this far away galaxy is to any defined edge of the universe however, is not at all clear. NO !!
If we know the universe is expanding, we are saying the universal boundary is expanding. I think it comes around the lines of the question, what existed before the big bang? =====Does the universe have a real edge and what's beyond it?? Even if the Universe is finite in size, it may still not have an ‘edge’, in the same way that the surface of the Earth is finite in area but doesn’t have an ‘edge’. The “Observable Universe” One of the problems with my simplistic edge of the universe theory is to do with what is called the “observable universe“. Let us suppose that the universe is “a giant sphere (radius = 14 billion parsecs) around the earth. The speed of light is just that — a speed — …

“ Is it possible to universe to be “a giant sphere (radius = 14 billion parsecs) around the earth. ! Before the big bang(s), there was "nothing".